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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
and this brings back sweet memories of when china was very isolated during the cold war. in the end, there's a whole new generation of people who have been much more sophisticated understanding, but that i would say it's a very strong autonomic response to the united states beefing up its forces in australia and then they wake up one morning and burma has flipped on them. it was eternal in terms of their faithful allies. these things caused a lot of consternation. so the old fear of diagnostically speaking in china is to fear with sand and travel without. these things happening around them excite them. >> how much does it add to that anxiety is that all? >> is the most problematic relationship now in japan and this is not good. i have to say i think japan probably hasn't played this as well as it might have, but i think on the other hand it would be fair to say also that it serves china's purposes to have something happening outside his orders which can rally people at home. there's a lot of complex things going on in each of these reactions to foreign movements outside. >> which ma
and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our dialogue in exchanges with china. we are also an handed our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes -- expanding our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes allocating our naval fleet to have a 60/40 split between the pacific and atlantic oceans, increasing army and marine presence in the region. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including new deployments of f- 22's and the mv22's to japan. and lay the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployment as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has rein
history tv on c-span3. >> china's emerging global power and maritime strategy were the focus of a panel discussion at the halifax international security forum. panelists discuss the territorial disputes involving japan in the east china sea, cybersecurity and international diplomacy. this is an hour, ten minutes. >> welcome back, everybody. this session for miscalculation, china and the rise of confusion or confucianism. i'd like to hand over to steve clemens who's moderating this session. .. >> thank you all for joining us. when i was thinking about the title today and thinking about our panel, it occurred to me, and i went online to find a chinese event that is being held right now looking at u.s. grand strategy, canada, japan and india. there are no canadian, japanese americans or canadians on china's panel. don't have any chinese with us today but we should have a lot of fun discussing that our national strategies but involving in the asian pacific region and with china but i want to acknowledge that that voice wasn't with us today. that might give us more room to run. because we do
of course its friend, china is on the security council and has blocked those kind of actions in the past, jenna. jenna: interesting that you mentioned china. is there any indication that the north koreans had help from the outside? any sort of outside country with this launch? >> reporter: well there is no evidence per se but it is widely known that the north koreans could not get the parts for their ballistic missile program without having those parts flown through china, bypassed through china. there also have been reports on the voice of america that an iranian team of scientists have been seen recently, in recent days in north korea. so there is questions about the relationship between, and any help that may have been provided to the north koreans by the iranians. clearly the north koreans are very proud of this long range ballistic missile launch. the one in april failed miserably. and for the first time then they admitted that it did fail publicly. this time they extended the window and did not invite foreign journalists to watch this and simply announced when it was successful. th
.n. security council. it's likely china will try to water down those provisions but it's also certain that the provisions will pass. >> you don't think china will try to veto it? >> i don't think they will veto it. they don't want north korea doing this. >> china is the only ally that they really have. i wonder, do you think it's possible they didn't inform china in advance of the timing of this launch? >> it's possible they did not. people now suspect that the information that we had that north korea was moving its rocket, something was wrong with it, was it an intentional deceptive move? they thought there would be attempts to shoot it down. they wanted to fool japan. they succeeded. >> and it certainly does strengthen the new young leader kim jong-un domestically. >> absolutely. they have been trying since 1998 to launch a long-range missile and they failed in the previous four attempts. they succeeded in this. it's not a rocket that can deliver a major warhead. there are marriajor hurdles to >> they have done in north korea where a lot of people are starving what south korea has b
. it was shocking. >> i was trying to get away from the camp and i ended up going north. >> did you know where china was? >> not at all. >> it just happened that the way i was going was toward the border. with luck and kunning, shin managed to steal and bribe his way across the border and work his way through china where he would have been sent back where he was caught. in shanghai he was granted asylum. in 2006 he arrived in south korea with not a friend in the world. he was so overwhelmed with culture shock and post traumatic stress he had to be hospitalized. he is 30 you now and has made friends and built a new life for himself. but old demons from camp 14 are never far behind. he admit there's was something he was hiding. two years ago he confessed. >> when he told me about the excuse about his mother and brother he didn't say he turned them in. >> you reported your mother and brother? >> yes. >> what did you hope to get out of reporting them? >> well, being full for the first time. >> more food? >> yes, but the biggest reason was i was supposed to report it. >> why was shin tortured after ratti
it over the last 8 years is to take out a credit card from the bank of china in the name of our children, driving up our national debt from $5 trillion from the first 42 presidents, number 43 ed a $4 trillion by his lonesome so we now have over $9 trillion of debt that we're going to have to pay back. $30,000 for every man, woman and child. that's irresponsible. it's unpatriotic. >> so, unpatriotic. >> the hypocrite in chief says in 2008 that 5 from is unpatriotic but now we're up to $16.4 trillion. that's okay. by the way we move my credit card limits. he doesn't want a debt ceiling going forward. >> debt ceiling no more can congress deal when the president says we're going to raise the debt ceiling. no squabbles back and forth. >> let me get this straight. borrow $4.8 billion a day and now we're coming to the edge ever the fiscal cliff. republicans are saying hey, let's continue the bush tax cuts, let's make this fair for everyone but let's stop spending. we are spending more than we have. democrats are saying now they are saying it doesn't matter, we are not focused on the deficit any
transportation. i'm concerned about education. i'm concerned about cutting in all of these areas that make china -- give china a bigger advantage as we move forward that give our global competitors a bigger advantage. that's what really concerns me. >> two quick observations. if you're in business and you're told we've got to make changes at our budget and you look at 6%, 15% of your budget, 9% of your budget, you've got to make cuts, you look at the 60% first and say where can we make manufacture she's cuts. talk about not endangering our ability to compete and win going forward, you don't want to cut those areas as steve has talked about eloquently many times, there are advantages which means you have to look at entitlements. and i think to michael's point, i think there's credit to that. two, i like the fact that boehner now is in a stronger position with his caucus because if indeed they find a deal, that means he can win a majority of his people over. i like the fact that nancy pelosi's in a strong position with her caucus. so the pieces are not only coming together substantively, they're c
? the chinese and russians don't help us on sanctions. they have been ineffective because china that dan. you know, when you look at it, everything that we have tried after the bush years has been a failure. now, during the bush years in the early part of that administration, it puts real financial squeeze on the regime. but then they drop it because they have this fantasy that if we can just sit down one more time with the north koreans, suddenly we will have a deal that will make all this go away. it is not how the world works. the north koreans are getting better each time out launching missiles and setting off nuclear explosions. >> on that note, how realistic do you think it is? and how soon do you think it would be that they would be able to i'm one of these long-range missiles with a nuclear warhead? >> that is the real question. this last missile test was real important because it showed that they were successful. they got it up into the atmosphere. it can go a long way to the united states. now, if they perfect nuclear explosions and start miniaturizing it, being able to put it on a
expensive to do business in countries like china. our workers have become even more productive. our energy costs are starting to go down here in the united states. and we still have the largest market. so when you factor in everything, it makes sense to invest here, in america. and that's one of the reasons why american manufacturing is growing at the fastest pace since the 1990s. and thanks in part to that boost in manufacturing, four years after the worst economic crisis of our lifetimes, our economy is growing again. our businesses have created more than 5.5 million new jobs over the past 33 months. so we're making progress. [applause] we're moving in the right direction. we're going forward. so what we need to do is simple. we need to keep going. we need to keep going forward. we should do everything we can to keep creating good middle- class jobs that help folks rebuild security for their families. [applause] and we should do everything we can to encourage companies like daimler to keep investing in american workers. and by the way, what we shouldn't do -- i just got to say this -- wh
at that route, you're leaving africa, going through central area, up around china, across the bering strait, i'm assuming you're taking a boat and through the americas. one of those, as i'm noticing, the strait line goes right through iran. how do you get through that? >> i think that -- iran straddles an ancient migration path into central asia and ideally it would be wonderful to set off on foot across iran. i'm going to see what relations are like in the late 2015, hopefully they're well enough, good enough, to allow me to go through iran. >> sreenivasan: if there's a necessary detour, how long does that take to get around? >> it's a big place to walk around. part of the beauty, i think, of this long project is that there are going to be obstacles that i don't know answers to about how to get around them until i get there. and we'll see. sarin dip city a big part of this project. >> sreenivasan: what are the types of steps you've been taking? you've been planning this for a last couple years. visas? immunizations. what else? >> there's a lot of logistical planning that's gone into getting m
invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se must have been a dozen of us -- got together with the leaders of china. we were accorded every courtesy we could possibly be accorded because of the presence of senator inouye and senator stevens. they were like brothers. they called one another "brothers." they acted that way in private. they served that way in the senate as chairman and vice-chairman and vice-chairman and chairman of the appropriations committee. they single-handedly shaped our american defense posture and they did it with skill and pay troivmen--and patriotism and the that very few could have. several senators have mentioned how bipartisan dan inouye was. he was of the old school. not a bad school for today, in my point of view. he treated each senator with
to pay toward china and the middle east will not let him. there was a successful sabotaging program against iran's nuclear program and a ery new approach of iran's central bank and other institutions that continues to enrich uranium. is kind of're seeing the twilight of america's cold war imperium in the middle east. the u.s. will have a relationship with the new egypt but it will not be the relationship of a client state that we saw with's the minority -- hosni mubarak or on war said sadat. is the changing relationship in the country like pakistan after the osama bin laden raid and in states like yemen. they look over the horizon that bahrain and say, we do not want that. host: one of the papers this morning has a story taking a look at the change in leadership in specific countries in asia and highlighting what is going on in north korea, south korea, and japan. what does that prove for the administration? guest: you can put north korea in the same category as japan and south korea. they have taken power and have produced leaders but are still checked by the open society and by th
; either us going nuclear in the korean war against china or from the korean peninsula and south korea today being a communist state under north korea. i want to ask if gayle shisler is in the audience tonight. gayle shisler, correct me if i'm wrong, is the granddaughter of o.p. smith. raised by o.p. smith because your father was killed in the world war ii. so we have here today the granddaughter -- and raised by smith -- of a genuine american hero, is i'd like -- so i'd like to give you both a round of applause. la. [applause] >> and if there's one thing i hope comings out of this book is the marine corps museum corrects the notion even in the marine corps that chesney polar was commander at the reservoir. >> i'm so glad that you raise this because really, for those of you who haven't red -- read the book yet, this is far the most recognized and still gripping story. it's really telling a powerful story. now, is it true, tom, as you've just shown for us that you have a soft spot for the marines? [laughter] he has been accused of being partial to the marines at the expense of the army.
it -- and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our dialogue and -- in exchanges with china. we are also an handed our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes -- expanding our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes allocating our naval fleet to have a 60/40 s plit between the pacific and atlantic oceans, increasing army and marine presence in the region. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including new deployments of f- 22's and the mv22's to japan. and lay the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployment as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)